Butternut Apple Crisp Recipe

We’ve all heard that an apple a day keeps the doctor away, and there’s actually plenty of truth behind that expression!

High in potassium, apples can help control blood pressure, plus the fiber-rich fruit can help reduce cholesterol.Apart from their health benefits, crisp, juicy apples are an autumnal kitchen staple.

Butternut Apple Crisp

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Recipe by Nutrition WorldCourse: DessertCuisine: American, Autumn
Servings

8

servings

    Tart apples and earthy butternut squash make this the perfect recipe for crisp autumn nights.

    Ingredients

    • 1

      small butternut squash

    • 3

      medium tart apples, peeled and sliced

    • ¼ cup

      corn syrup

    • 2 tablespoons

      lemon juice

    • ¾ cup

      packed brown sugar

    • 1 tablespoon

      cornstarch

    • 1 tablespoon

      ground cinnamon

    • ½ teaspoon

      salt

    • ½ cup

      all-purpose flour

    • ½ cup

      quick-cooking oats

    • ¼ cup

      brown sugar, packed

    • 6 tablespoons

      cold butter

    Directions

    • Preheat oven to 375°F and grease a 13" x 9" x 2" baking dish. 

    • Cut the squash into thin slices and remove the seeds. Mix the squash, apples, corn syrup, and lemon juices together in a large bowl. 

    • In another bowl, mix the sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, and salt. When mixed, combine with the squash and apple mixture and place in the greased baking dish. 

    • Bake, covered, for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, mix the flour, oats, and brown sugar together. Add butter and mix until it resembles coarse crumbs. 

    • Sprinkle over the baked apples and squash, return to the oven, and continue baking, uncovered, for 25 minutes. Serve warm.

    Nutrition Facts (per serving):

    • Calories—330 | Total Fat—9g | Cholesterol —25mg | Saturated Fat—6g | Sodium—230mg | Carbohydrate—62g | Dietary Fiber—4g | Protein —2g

    Facts about Apples:

    How to Choose:

    There are thousands of types of apples, and which you choose really depends on your preferences and the dish you’ll be making. According to The Washington State Apple Advertising Commission, some of the most popular apple types can be described as:

    Red Delicious: crunchy and mildly sweet

    Golden Delicious: mellow and sweet

    Gala: crisp, aromatically sweet

    Fuji: super-sweet and crisp

    Granny Smith: extremely tart and juicy

    Honeycrisp: tangy-sweet 

    Storing Wisdom:

    Keep them in the fridge. Apples are best stored in the refrigerator, with access to humidity. Place them in the crisper drawer with a damp paper towel on top as soon as you get them home.

    Did you know?

    If something is as American as apple pie, it’s actually not all that American after all. History books trace pie-making as far back as 14th century England, and those skills, along with apple seeds, arrived on U.S. soil thanks to the Pilgrims. 

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